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Championship Productions Featured Items!

older | 1 | .... | 3 | 4 | (Page 5)

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    with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    One of the top tactical trends in Europe is breaking the last line of defense and the different ways a team can achieve this. In this video, Jay Hoffman demonstrates how he teaches his team to break the lines and the techniques that have made his team an attacking threat. These tactics have given his team back to back NCAA Final Four and Elite Eight appearances.

    Coach Hoffman shows you how important it is to have the correct team shape, timing of runs, proper decision-making and the right attitude toward breaking the lines. He provides in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, to show these different ideas on how to break the lines. He explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Good communication before you pass the ball
    • Vertical, lateral & "C" cup runs by the high target player
    • Runs that trigger other runs going into the final third
    • Getting players to the correct foot, which will lay the foundation to break the lines

    Mastering the Tactic of Breaking Lines

    Hoffman has specific instructions to apply to your training sessions. All five of these training instructions can be applied in different aspects of the game.

    • Three Step Rule - This rule encourages getting away after making a pass to create space
    • Leave and Replace - Leave a space to create space
    • Play Faster but Keep Possession - One touch is the fastest way, but, it's not always the best way to play
    • Pass the Ball Where the Defender is Not - Look for the open foot or side away from the defender to help retain possession
    • Play the Player that is Moving - Don't go for the "home run" ball when it isn't on

    Practice Segments

    Hoffman develops a fluid session that encourages players to constantly think about how to get behind the line of defense. One of the things he does well is create exercises that reflect the true speed of the game. His progressions within each exercise are meaningful and his restrictions challenge players to try different ways to break in behind the last line of defense.

    He begins with a three-man unopposed passing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to break the line. The emphasis in this drill is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing, the decision-making based on which foot the player receives with, and how to play based on the type of pressure the player has on their back.

    The second progression is a 4v1 small sided game. This is where he trains his players to play using the correct shape, runs and decision-making to be able to break the line. Hoffman demonstrates two progressions within the 4v1 that help drive the point home with the type of runs needed to be dangerous. After the 4v1, he adds more pressure to make it 4v2, 4v3 and 4v4. During these games, the focus changes more to the decision-making based on the defender's positioning and implementing Hoffman's five training principles.

    The third segment features a 4v4 game using all three thirds of the field. It's here the players try and keep possession in the middle third to be able to find that entry ball in the opponent's final third. This small-sided game does a great job of getting your players to make the correct runs off the ball to be dangerous. After players grasp playing in the thirds, they play a normal game to find the solutions within the game.

    Every coach must teach their team how to break down opposition lines - Coach Hoffman does that, and more, in this innovative video!

    57 minutes. 2016


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    RD-04934A: with Ian Barker,
    Director of Coaching Education, NSCAA;
    21 years of college soccer coaching experience at Macalester College and University of Wisconsin;
    served for 10 years as the director of coaching and player development for the Minnesota Youth Soccer Association (MYSA)

    Ian Barker demonstrates 13 warm-up drills that allow variation and progression with economy and fluidity. Coach Barker works with men and women (separately) to model attacking, defending, transitioning and even goalkeeping activation drills. The drills emphasize a blend of technical and physical demands with team communication.

    Coach Barker's drills lend themselves to rapid decision-making and variability potential to suit your preferences. You'll see how to move players efficiently and intensively through single-player technical ball touches, as well as partnered work that moves up the body to thigh, chest, and head touches and on to passing line and full-team drills.

    Warm-Up Activities

    There are 11 activities in this section that will get your players up and moving. They are designed for athletes of all levels and each drill progresses into the next. The activities include:

    • Mirror Activity - Great activities for shadowing and movement within a fun and competitive drill. You can use this as a drill to activate movement or it can be tied into training as part of 1v1 defending.
    • Scramble - This section can be looked at as chaos with a purpose. Coach Barker uses some cues that all coaches can steal and use in their own training sessions.
    • Knock and Move - Helps players understand how to stay onside and move wide to get into position to receive a lead pass.Keeper Warm-up - Trains the keeper's need to recognize the type of pass coming to them and handle it the proper way. A great way to get everyone involved in the warm-up.
    • Ladder - Coach Barker uses ladder agility drills to teach multiple movements and agility while finding the ball or getting touches on the ball once athletes have changed direction.
    • Technical Circles - This section takes all of the skills an athlete has and puts them together in different phases to get lots of touches on the ball. Partners will work in a whole-team framework. The premium placed on communication and blend of individual footwork, passing, and rapid decision-making synthesizes the fluid components of the game played at high levels.

    You'll see Coach Barker instruct players on points of emphasis, singling out specific player movements or decisions for praise or critique at appropriate moments.

    Coach Barker models and explains over 70 minutes of progressive warm-up and activation drills that work for beginning and advanced players. The wide variety of activities allows players to work their way intensively and efficiently into peak technical, physical, and psychological readiness.

    77 minutes. 2016.



    RD-04934B:

    with Ian Barker,
    Director of Coaching Education, NSCAA;
    21 years of college soccer coaching experience at Macalester College and University of Wisconsin;
    served for 10 years as the director of coaching and player development for the Minnesota Youth Soccer Association (MYSA)

    Learn how to take activities you currently use and adapt them to work on different components of the game

    • Learn shooting drills that will increase your team's scoring opportunities
    • Learn small sided games to improve speed of play in attacking and defending
    • Use creative passing exercises to develop your players' soccer awareness
    Currently serving as the NSCAA's Director of Coaching Education, Ian Barker presents 10+ small group exercises that will make the good coach a better coach, and the effective coach more effective. These training exercises can be used with any age group.

    Building a Successful Training Session

    Coach Barker lays out the traits needed to build an efficient and successful practice. Once the video moves to the field, Coach Barker provides examples of these coaching necessities. He provides the five essentials of an effective coach.

    Training Exercises

    These exercises are built around the four components of soccer: Technical, tactical (or decisions), physical and psychological. An example of some of the exercises you will see include:

    • 5v2+3 - A traditional keep away game with a transition tied into it. A great game for teaching transitions and can be used for pressing. The section goes on and becomes progressive building on each game.
    • 4v4 - Filled with many good opportunities for teaching paired defending and passing to keep possession.
    • 1v1 to 2v2 - Ideal for teams who like to press or play more forward soccer. Players try to score on a small gate diagonal from where they start. The game then moves to a 2v2 situation, where you must work with your partner to widen the defenders out or if defending learns to have 1 defender press while the other has a choice.
    • Shooting Activities - This section has three drills that are very progressive. Each drill adds a different element to a pass, pass back, shot, then movement to crash the net and receive a cross from the corner. The combination of a shot from straight on and then the cross is a great way to teach movement to the net. The added element of adding a partner also helps with learning to communicate as you attack with numbers. All the drills require the players to move around a mannequin and either hides the ball to drop it or to shot once around the mannequin. All of these situations are game like situations.
    • Triangle Passing - Set up so four players practice three passing activities before entering into a 3v1 keep away exercise. Coach Barker's explanation of how a pass towards the player back foot instead of their front foot puts the receiving player in better position to pass the ball and keep possession moving.
    • 1v1 Gates - This section has good explanation of attacking 1v1 and defends 1v1.

    Barker does great work with explaining all the sections and what coaches should expect from each drill. He stops the play as needed to explain what he is looking for.

    70 minutes. 2016.



    RD-04934C: with Ian Barker,
    Director of Coaching Education, NSCAA;
    21 years of college soccer coaching experience at Macalester College and University of Wisconsin;
    served for 10 years as the director of coaching and player development for the Minnesota Youth Soccer Association (MYSA)

    The ability to recognize numbers advantages in the run of play is something all coaches want from their players. NSCAA NSCAA Director of Coaching Education Ian Barker shows you how to build up your attack and how to train your players to recognize numbers-up situations.

    Through a progression of small-sided games, your players will learn when and how to add width and length to the field. Coach Barker chooses proper times to freeze play and utilizes these moments to teach players recognition during each situation.

    1 v. 1, 2 v. 1, 3 v. 1 and More

    Once your players master their touches on the ball, they must begin to master their position on the field and how it relates to their teammates and opponents. Starting with 1v1, Barker breaks down each scenario and how to add another offensive player in the situation. He emphasizes the four components of quality coaching:

    • Creating space away from the ball to improve attacking chances.
    • Utilizing your goalkeeper as a viable option to help counter movements and to alleviate pressure.
    • Switching the ball quickly and attacking with pace to fully take advantage of a transition moment.
    • Using zones as the session continues to build allows the players to see the functionality of their spacing.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Barker progresses from having players compete in restricted areas to giving them freedom to play and apply what they learned. Practice builds up until players take on more complex off the ball movements. Many of the progression include teaching movements to create spacing such as:

    • Give width and length.
    • Utilize the target to establish spacing.
    • Interchange with a teammate.

    You will get five drills to help your players understand their position on and off the ball and how it relates to play on the pitch. Coach Barker's dynamic drills create real play situations and offer players several options in obtaining a numerical advantage, while supporting the effort of quick recovery in numbers down and maintaining balance on the field.

    Coach Barker also discusses his four components of soccer, how to blend in different variables like time restrictions, and gives tips for effective coaching.

    This video is sure to help your team improve their attacking. Through establishing width, playing in a numbers up or numbers down situation, transitioning with pace and more, Coach Barker shows you adaptable sessions that teach key soccer principles.

    59 minutes. 2016.




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  • 07/24/18--22:00: Finishing Drills for Soccer
  • with Tim Vom Steeg,
    University of California, Santa Barbara Head Men's Soccer Coach,
    2x NSCAA National Coach of the Year (2004 & '06);
    2x Big West Conference Coach of the Year;
    all time winningest coach in Big West history;
    2008 California Community College Coaches Hall of Fame Inductee

    Tim Vom Steeg is a former National Coach of the year and has a National Championship in his resume, neither would have been possible without being able to train his players to score under pressure.

    In this detailed soccer DVD, Coach Vom Steeg will take you through a variety of finishing drills that start with low pressure, high success scoring chances and build up to game like, high pressure small area situations.

    These exercise will give your players numerous goal-scoring chances with a lot of repetition in many different intense scenarios. These drills will give you new ways to train your athletes to:

    • Learn how ball position and eye contact between players can be the determining factors on the accuracy of any shot.
    • Get off a quick and accurate shot in a tight space with a defender closing in on them
    • Develop dribbling skills under pressure
    • Make more second-chance shots
    • and more ...

    Each exercise emphasizes a low, hard shot, which will force the goalie to make a tough save and possibly create a rebound scoring chance. Rebounds are more valuable than shots off target, and they create excellent goal-scoring opportunities.

    With these fast paced drills, your team will excel on the offensive end of the field and hopefully finish with a championship season.

    54 minutes. 2011.


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    with Coach George Gelnovatch,
    University of Virginia Head Men's Soccer Coach,
    2009 NCAA National Champions,
    Assistant Coach on the 2002 U.S. Men's National Team that competed in the 2002 FIFA World Cup (Korea/Japan),
    4x ACC Championships,
    200+ career wins

    George Gelnovatch delivers an inside look at his training, drills, and philosophies and provides a look into the purpose and fundamentals of video breakdown.

    Coach Gelnovatch takes you through key areas that his team has used to build success:

    • A warm-up routine that combines stretching and conditioning with technical training. Use conditioning exercises to build game stamina and develop technique.
    • Technical and tactical moving and passing drills to help with ball technique and field awareness. Enhance your players' ability to look for passing lanes, keep the ball moving and play through a central man. Develop shorter, quicker passes that will open up the playing field and allow your players to break down the opponent and get into scoring situations.
    • Small sided games using 6 v 6 strategies. Enhance your players' ability to spread the field, seek out open passing lanes and communicate more effectively. By improving these abilities, players will think quickly and logically, in turn making them more effective and less reactive in game situations.
    • Using video analysis with the individual player and the team. See two film sessions. A team film session focused on key defensive strategies defensive restarts and team pressure. And an individual player film session where Gelnovatch breaks down the player's decision-making, weaknesses and strengths that can help him improve at his particular position.

    This All Access soccer instruction will show you the inner workings of a Division I program and some of the techniques and tactics used by the Virginia coaching staff. Through work ethic, team concepts, discipline and leadership Gelnovatch shows how he has used these ideas to create one of the most dominating college soccer programs in the nation.

    This DVD will help any coach with easy to understand and easy to implement ideas and concepts to improve their coaching and their teams!

    143 minutes. 2010.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's practice can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


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    with Schellas Hyndman,
    Grand Canyon University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    former FC Dallas (MLS) Head Coach; 2010 MLS Coach of the Year;
    former SMU Head Coach; guided SMU to 22 NCAA Tournaments in 24 years as Head Coach, won 15 conference titles and was named conference coach of the year eight times; NSCAA Director of Coaching Emeritus

    Counter-attack soccer has evolved into more than just a moment in a game. This new style of soccer is becoming the fundamental attack for many teams in the world. In this DVD, Schellas Hyndman focuses on how you can incorporate counter-attack soccer into your style of play.

    Coach Hyndman thoroughly breaks down moments of transition in a game and how your players can recognize those moments. He does a great job teaching the key elements of counter-attack and then shows, through multiple exercises, how to apply those elements to a practice session. Players will learn the different types of counter-attacks and how each helps the team.

    3 Types of Counter-Attack

    Counter-attack can be defined in many ways. It's important for players to understand the different methods to counter-attack effectively. Coach Hyndman emphasizes three methods that teams use to generate a counter attack:

    • Running and dribbling with the ball into the opponent's area
    • Two to three quick passes forward
    • Long balls over the top

    His progressive training activity illustrates all three of these methods. A great measure of flexibility is afforded for you to pull out the segments that make the most sense in your own circumstance.

    Counter-Attack Practice Segments

    Coach Hyndman moves the session along from discussing angles and pockets of where players can receive the ball to begin the counter-attack, to playing against more defenders with a different array of numbers advantages.

    Practice builds up to players being put in different situations where they have to make decisions on how to counter-attack. Coach Hyndman stops play to describe how players can make a sound decision in these moments. He also discusses several key elements to counter-attack such as:

    • Immediate forward action
    • Teammates' willingness to support
    • Finding swift solutions to problems by looking for opportunities

    Coach Hyndman discusses the differences between a fast break and collective counter and between a solo counter and advanced counter.

    4v4+1 Exercise

    Most of the drills in this video start from a 4v4+1 set up. Coach Hyndman brilliantly incorporates quick ball speed, immediate forward action, a minimum number of passes and fast finishing into this activity. The activity can be expanded into numerous alternate iterations such as a 3v2, 5v1 or 5v2 counter. It's useful to be able to select the counter that best suits your own team.

    Relying on his professional experience as a player and coach, Schellas Hyndman outlines the basis of an effective counter-attack, then illustrates the development of a counter attacking mindset. Under the high pressure of these progressive activities, your players will learn to rapidly penetrate under the pressure of a recovering defensive unit.

    70 minutes. 2017.


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    with Brandon Koons,
    Otterbein University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III Final Four; 8x Ohio Athletic Conference regular-season and 5x OAC Tournament Champions;
    5x OAC Coach of the Year; has earned a USSF "B" License and an NSCAA Premier Diploma

    Games at the highest level are won or lost in the midfield third, and coaches are always seeking the upper hand to dominate this key area. Your midfield players must possess the technical skill to be able to expose the spaces in front, behind, and in the flanks of the opposition.

    Brandon Koons demonstrates a series of small-sided games he uses to build exceptional midfield players, which has made his teams an attacking threat en route to 13 conference titles. Coach Koons breaks up this video into six keys games. Within each game, he breaks down and shows numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous in the midfield.

    Using in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, Koons explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • The movement and angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reading the play and making proper decisions based on positioning to find numbers-up situations.
    • What runs trigger other runs to penetrate going forward.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.
    Turning

    Center midfielders need to practice the critical skill of turning, as well as connecting right-to-left and back-to-front. Watch as Coach Koons sets up a series of small sided games that focus on quick ball movement in a small space. These transition games teach players how to defend in a frantic environment as well as how to counterattack quickly when winning the ball. The progressions build these games up from an individual focus to a team focus to drive home the concept.

    Passing and Dribbling

    See how space manipulation within the small-sided games determines the speed and quality of passing and dribbling required for the center midfielder to control the game. These games force players to perform under controlled defensive pressure and be aware of maximizing the space available to play in. The fast and chaotic pace of these transition games forces players to be very aware of how the game develops in order to be successful.

    Awareness

    All of the small sided games presented by Coach Koons are excellent training methods to help develop field awareness. These games involve constant movement within a quick and ever-changing environment. In addition to building on individual skills, these games develop knowing where players are within the game and how they're impacting it. These games tie the technical, tactical, and cognitive skills of the center midfielder together.

    Small Sided Games

    The games presented on this video include:

    • North, South, East, West - The emphasis in this physical and psychologically-demanding game is on developing transition. As the game progresses in numbers, the angles of support are critical to maintain possession and build.
    • End Zone Game - This is where Coach Koons trains players to evaluate the spaces and options given to them by the defenders. It's during this game that Koons stresses which balls to play based on straight or angles runs and how important verbal and non-verbal communication can be in the midfield.
    • Double End Zone Game - Here, Koons teaches players to play off a forward's feet and what runs can be made off of it to be dangerous. He reiterates the importance of the different types of runs his players can make to not only create space for themselves, but also the ability to combine and find third-man runners.
    • The Mourinho Game - In this game, players are always on their toes and ready to not only take advantage of numbers-up situations, but also to delay and defend based on the coach's command. Based on what number the coach calls, certain players have to quickly change which field they are playing on to sprint and quickly assess the situation on the next field of play.
    • Four Goal Game - Coach Koons introduces how to create numbers-up situations with the player on the ball. During the five different progressions in this game, players are able to experience different situations on how to penetrate through playing off a target player, through balls, and the runs coming out of the midfield to create third man runs.

    Through the use of small area games and space manipulation, see how to help your players become effective and efficient at ball movement. Using these competitive transition games from Coach Koons, you'll be able to teach your team how individual skills benefit team play.

    145 minutes. 2017.


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    with Dave Brandt,
    Pittsburgh Riverhounds Head Coach;
    former US Naval Academy Head Men's Soccer Coach,
    All-time winningest coach in NCAA history,
    four-time National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA) Coach of the Year;
    6x NCAA Division III Championships at Messiah College,
    career winning percentage of .887

    Step onto the field with the NCAA's all-time winningest coach, Dave Brandt, as he leads you through game action drills and variations to build your players' skills to the maximum. Using both whiteboard diagrams and practice footage, Coach Brandt makes sure you know exactly how to effectively teach and run each drill. Brandt's drills will produce quality dribbling, passing, one-touch passing, two-touch shooting, finishing shots with precision and more. These drills will train your players to make quick and controlled decisions, which will pay off in game situations. Brandt has proven that these drills are effective for producing great results in soccer practice and in game situations.

    64 minutes. 2009.


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    with Bobby Clark, University of Notre Dame Men's Head Coach,
    2013 NCAA Champions - first-ever title in Notre Dame men's soccer history;
    2013 NSCAA Coach of the Year, 2013 ACC Coach of the Year; 2013 ACC Regular Season Champions; Clark has led the Irish to 12 NCAA Tournament appearances (2001-13)

    World-class soccer coach Bobby Clark shows you how to improve your team's possession time. With more time on the ball, your team creates more opportunities in the attack, and reduces opportunities for your opponent. Coach Clark diagrams drills on the whiteboard before demonstrating them on the field, providing a better learning experience for both coaches and athletes.

    Keep Ball Transition Grid
    These grid drills, which work on possessing in transition, start as a 3v1 and progress to 7v5. They can be used as warm-ups to get players working on quick one- and two-touch passing. Players learn how to support their teammates, and create angles to help them pass out of pressure. The importance of playing a soft pass to draw the defender and then a firm pass to split the defense or to get around them quickly is also discussed.

    The "10v6 + 4 Drill" emphasizes seeing the whole field and looking for the open man both near and far. The defenders try to force the turnover by reading and stepping to the offense before a pass is made.

    Barcelona Keep Drills
    A great first touch creates space and time to decide the best option going forward. Coach Clark demonstrates his adaptations of two drills from one of the world's top club teams, FC Barcelona. These challenging drills will teach players how to maintain possession with limited touches.

    Similar to the Barcelona Keep Drill, the Bigger Barcelona Drill focuses on spacing players to make it tougher for the defense to get the ball. This is a great game-like drill that gives options for getting past the defense by working around the opponent, going through the opponent or over the top of the opponent.

    Increase possession time with these exceptional keep ball drills. Possess with a purpose and become a team that plays quicker than opponents both on and off the ball.

    75 minutes. 2014.


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    RD-04934A: with Ian Barker,
    Director of Coaching Education, NSCAA;
    21 years of college soccer coaching experience at Macalester College and University of Wisconsin;
    served for 10 years as the director of coaching and player development for the Minnesota Youth Soccer Association (MYSA)

    Ian Barker demonstrates 13 warm-up drills that allow variation and progression with economy and fluidity. Coach Barker works with men and women (separately) to model attacking, defending, transitioning and even goalkeeping activation drills. The drills emphasize a blend of technical and physical demands with team communication.

    Coach Barker's drills lend themselves to rapid decision-making and variability potential to suit your preferences. You'll see how to move players efficiently and intensively through single-player technical ball touches, as well as partnered work that moves up the body to thigh, chest, and head touches and on to passing line and full-team drills.

    Warm-Up Activities

    There are 11 activities in this section that will get your players up and moving. They are designed for athletes of all levels and each drill progresses into the next. The activities include:

    • Mirror Activity - Great activities for shadowing and movement within a fun and competitive drill. You can use this as a drill to activate movement or it can be tied into training as part of 1v1 defending.
    • Scramble - This section can be looked at as chaos with a purpose. Coach Barker uses some cues that all coaches can steal and use in their own training sessions.
    • Knock and Move - Helps players understand how to stay onside and move wide to get into position to receive a lead pass.Keeper Warm-up - Trains the keeper's need to recognize the type of pass coming to them and handle it the proper way. A great way to get everyone involved in the warm-up.
    • Ladder - Coach Barker uses ladder agility drills to teach multiple movements and agility while finding the ball or getting touches on the ball once athletes have changed direction.
    • Technical Circles - This section takes all of the skills an athlete has and puts them together in different phases to get lots of touches on the ball. Partners will work in a whole-team framework. The premium placed on communication and blend of individual footwork, passing, and rapid decision-making synthesizes the fluid components of the game played at high levels.

    You'll see Coach Barker instruct players on points of emphasis, singling out specific player movements or decisions for praise or critique at appropriate moments.

    Coach Barker models and explains over 70 minutes of progressive warm-up and activation drills that work for beginning and advanced players. The wide variety of activities allows players to work their way intensively and efficiently into peak technical, physical, and psychological readiness.

    77 minutes. 2016.



    RD-04934B:

    with Ian Barker,
    Director of Coaching Education, NSCAA;
    21 years of college soccer coaching experience at Macalester College and University of Wisconsin;
    served for 10 years as the director of coaching and player development for the Minnesota Youth Soccer Association (MYSA)

    Learn how to take activities you currently use and adapt them to work on different components of the game

    • Learn shooting drills that will increase your team's scoring opportunities
    • Learn small sided games to improve speed of play in attacking and defending
    • Use creative passing exercises to develop your players' soccer awareness
    Currently serving as the NSCAA's Director of Coaching Education, Ian Barker presents 10+ small group exercises that will make the good coach a better coach, and the effective coach more effective. These training exercises can be used with any age group.

    Building a Successful Training Session

    Coach Barker lays out the traits needed to build an efficient and successful practice. Once the video moves to the field, Coach Barker provides examples of these coaching necessities. He provides the five essentials of an effective coach.

    Training Exercises

    These exercises are built around the four components of soccer: Technical, tactical (or decisions), physical and psychological. An example of some of the exercises you will see include:

    • 5v2+3 - A traditional keep away game with a transition tied into it. A great game for teaching transitions and can be used for pressing. The section goes on and becomes progressive building on each game.
    • 4v4 - Filled with many good opportunities for teaching paired defending and passing to keep possession.
    • 1v1 to 2v2 - Ideal for teams who like to press or play more forward soccer. Players try to score on a small gate diagonal from where they start. The game then moves to a 2v2 situation, where you must work with your partner to widen the defenders out or if defending learns to have 1 defender press while the other has a choice.
    • Shooting Activities - This section has three drills that are very progressive. Each drill adds a different element to a pass, pass back, shot, then movement to crash the net and receive a cross from the corner. The combination of a shot from straight on and then the cross is a great way to teach movement to the net. The added element of adding a partner also helps with learning to communicate as you attack with numbers. All the drills require the players to move around a mannequin and either hides the ball to drop it or to shot once around the mannequin. All of these situations are game like situations.
    • Triangle Passing - Set up so four players practice three passing activities before entering into a 3v1 keep away exercise. Coach Barker's explanation of how a pass towards the player back foot instead of their front foot puts the receiving player in better position to pass the ball and keep possession moving.
    • 1v1 Gates - This section has good explanation of attacking 1v1 and defends 1v1.

    Barker does great work with explaining all the sections and what coaches should expect from each drill. He stops the play as needed to explain what he is looking for.

    70 minutes. 2016.



    RD-04934C: with Ian Barker,
    Director of Coaching Education, NSCAA;
    21 years of college soccer coaching experience at Macalester College and University of Wisconsin;
    served for 10 years as the director of coaching and player development for the Minnesota Youth Soccer Association (MYSA)

    The ability to recognize numbers advantages in the run of play is something all coaches want from their players. NSCAA NSCAA Director of Coaching Education Ian Barker shows you how to build up your attack and how to train your players to recognize numbers-up situations.

    Through a progression of small-sided games, your players will learn when and how to add width and length to the field. Coach Barker chooses proper times to freeze play and utilizes these moments to teach players recognition during each situation.

    1 v. 1, 2 v. 1, 3 v. 1 and More

    Once your players master their touches on the ball, they must begin to master their position on the field and how it relates to their teammates and opponents. Starting with 1v1, Barker breaks down each scenario and how to add another offensive player in the situation. He emphasizes the four components of quality coaching:

    • Creating space away from the ball to improve attacking chances.
    • Utilizing your goalkeeper as a viable option to help counter movements and to alleviate pressure.
    • Switching the ball quickly and attacking with pace to fully take advantage of a transition moment.
    • Using zones as the session continues to build allows the players to see the functionality of their spacing.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Barker progresses from having players compete in restricted areas to giving them freedom to play and apply what they learned. Practice builds up until players take on more complex off the ball movements. Many of the progression include teaching movements to create spacing such as:

    • Give width and length.
    • Utilize the target to establish spacing.
    • Interchange with a teammate.

    You will get five drills to help your players understand their position on and off the ball and how it relates to play on the pitch. Coach Barker's dynamic drills create real play situations and offer players several options in obtaining a numerical advantage, while supporting the effort of quick recovery in numbers down and maintaining balance on the field.

    Coach Barker also discusses his four components of soccer, how to blend in different variables like time restrictions, and gives tips for effective coaching.

    This video is sure to help your team improve their attacking. Through establishing width, playing in a numbers up or numbers down situation, transitioning with pace and more, Coach Barker shows you adaptable sessions that teach key soccer principles.

    59 minutes. 2016.




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  • 08/08/18--22:00: Finishing Drills for Soccer
  • with Tim Vom Steeg,
    University of California, Santa Barbara Head Men's Soccer Coach,
    2x NSCAA National Coach of the Year (2004 & '06);
    2x Big West Conference Coach of the Year;
    all time winningest coach in Big West history;
    2008 California Community College Coaches Hall of Fame Inductee

    Tim Vom Steeg is a former National Coach of the year and has a National Championship in his resume, neither would have been possible without being able to train his players to score under pressure.

    In this detailed soccer DVD, Coach Vom Steeg will take you through a variety of finishing drills that start with low pressure, high success scoring chances and build up to game like, high pressure small area situations.

    These exercise will give your players numerous goal-scoring chances with a lot of repetition in many different intense scenarios. These drills will give you new ways to train your athletes to:

    • Learn how ball position and eye contact between players can be the determining factors on the accuracy of any shot.
    • Get off a quick and accurate shot in a tight space with a defender closing in on them
    • Develop dribbling skills under pressure
    • Make more second-chance shots
    • and more ...

    Each exercise emphasizes a low, hard shot, which will force the goalie to make a tough save and possibly create a rebound scoring chance. Rebounds are more valuable than shots off target, and they create excellent goal-scoring opportunities.

    With these fast paced drills, your team will excel on the offensive end of the field and hopefully finish with a championship season.

    54 minutes. 2011.


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    with Dave Brandt,
    Pittsburgh Riverhounds Head Coach;
    former US Naval Academy Head Men's Soccer Coach,
    All-time winningest coach in NCAA history,
    four-time National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA) Coach of the Year;
    6x NCAA Division III Championships at Messiah College,
    career winning percentage of .887

    Step onto the field with the NCAA's all-time winningest coach, Dave Brandt, as he leads you through game action drills and variations to build your players' skills to the maximum. Using both whiteboard diagrams and practice footage, Coach Brandt makes sure you know exactly how to effectively teach and run each drill. Brandt's drills will produce quality dribbling, passing, one-touch passing, two-touch shooting, finishing shots with precision and more. These drills will train your players to make quick and controlled decisions, which will pay off in game situations. Brandt has proven that these drills are effective for producing great results in soccer practice and in game situations.

    64 minutes. 2009.


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  • 08/09/18--22:00: Playing the 4-2-3-1 System
  • with Marcus Wood, Hardin-Simmons University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III National Champions; 2010 NSCA National Coach of the Year;
    ranks third all-time among NCAA women's soccer coaches at all levels in career winning percentage (.868); 8x American Southwest Conference Coach of the Year; 11x American Southwest Conference champions (including 10 in a row); over 230 career wins; NCAA Record 145 game conference unbeaten streak

    Develop the key techniques and tactics needed to support a reliable system of play.

    Defensively, it allows you to stay organized and compact. Offensively, it allows you to keep numbers around the ball and maintain possession.

    Because it provides defensive stability while still allowing your team to attack aggressively, the 4-2-3-1 is widely used throughout the word. Top-level clubs like Barcelona rely on this system to consistently dominate their opposition .

    Using bulleted coaching points, game footage, tactical chalkboard study and in-depth analysis, Coach Wood breaks down each vital component of successful soccer play using the 4-2-3-1 system. Key coaching points include:

    • training players to recognize the proper visual cues defensively and offensively
    • showing players how to choose the best type of run on the attack
    • developing player skills appropriate for each position

    Coach Wood pays special attention to each required skill and shows them in action through game play. All 11 positions are technically and tactically reviewed to help you know when and how to apply the appropriate coaching points. You'll also learn how to use this information to develop player skills that are appropriate for each position, In addition to the wealth of knowledge and detail provided by Wood, all coaching points and techniques are displayed in a format that will allow you to share the information with your players.

    The 4-2-3-1 system may sound complex, but with Coach Wood's tips and tactics you and your players will be able to play in this formation with confidence.

    73 minutes. 2013.


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    with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Jay Entlich shows you how to incorporate the 3-5-2 system of play into your program. He breaks the system down into three phases and explains each in detail before taking the field for a live practice.

    You'll learn how to position players based on defensive pressure on the ball. These tactics will give your team options no matter what situation or position they're in.

    Throughout Coach Entlich's 3-5-2 practice session, he keeps 22 players participating in the game for the entire practice. He uses "in-game" coaching points to teach individuals and also stops play occasionally to make team tactical points.

    Phase I - Getting used to the System of Play for a 3-5-2

    Phase I is an unopposed phase, which allows your players to get used to the nuances of positional reads as the game develops. Coach Entlich makes coaching points during play as well as stop action rehearsals as players get used to how they fit in the system.

    Phase II - Adds opposition and forces players to think and make decisions on the fly

    Phase II adds opposition playing in the same formation, but with an adjustment in the midfield that gives you two options on how to play the system.

      One style is more aggressive, using two attacking central midfielders.The other style is more defensive, using two defending central midfielders.

    Coach Entlich sets up an activity that helps bring out individual positional play and descriptions so all players can understand their roles and those of their teammates.

    Phase III - The real game!

    Phase III advances to two teams with goalkeepers in a real game, but with a modification to emphasize the key advantages to using the 3-5-2 system of play. Coach Entlich has players work on playing through the center of the field so when one team is in possession, the other team must have two of their center mids kneel down. This creates an advantage and promotes success in the attack. Your players will absorb and adapt to the formation while being totally engaged in playing the real game.

    This video is a complete dissection of the 3-5-2 style of play and a step-by-step method to incorporate it into your program. Your team will learn the expected runs of all supporting players, how to make decisions on the fly, combining to beat defenders and how to place the ball into dangerous areas.

    68 minutes. 2016.


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    with Brandon Koons,
    Otterbein University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III Final Four; 8x Ohio Athletic Conference regular-season and 5x OAC Tournament Champions;
    5x OAC Coach of the Year; has earned a USSF "B" License and an NSCAA Premier Diploma

    Midfielders are one of the more important positions in the game and need to constantly support and help their teammates.

    In this video, Brandon Koons shows you how he trains the technical application of individual skills for midfielders to dominate the center of the field. You will learn how important it is to have the correct body shape, timing of runs, proper decision making, and the right attitude to excel.

    Coach Koons breaks up this video into three keys areas. Within each, he breaks down and shows numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous in the midfield. Coach Koons provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show key technical elements for your players. Coach Koons explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reading the play and making the proper decisions based on positioning.
    • Runs that trigger other runs in the midfield third.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.

    Turning

    Koons addresses the ability to turn in a dynamic setting by demonstrating a three-man unopposed passing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to turn and play forward. The emphasis in this drill is on developing a good sense of rhythm when passing and making sure the angles of support are correct. He progresses by adding additional ways to be able to turn and face up the opposition.

    Watch as Coach Koons walks his team through dealing with overweighted passes and how the center middies take pace off the ball to make a successful turn and pass. Conversely, see how to deal with an underweighted pass. The benefits of proper body positioning and an awareness of the playing environment are also discussed.

    Passing and Dribbling

    Koons walks through a series of passing and dribbling progressions that encourage good on-ball and off-ball movement. Throughout the progressions, he encourages ball movement through an emphasis on creativity, which is supported by communication, touch quality, an understanding of run shape, and an awareness of game space.

    Overlapping

    Learn a great progression to work on tight overlapping runs and how the center midfielder moves and interacts within a confined area. See how Koons teaches his players the different types of runs they can make to not only create space for themselves, but also the ability to combine and find third man runners. Throughout the unopposed exercises, he continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be to rip even the most compact defenses apart in a competitive environment.

    The overlapping drills build on the prior drills in this video and are a good way to tie the session together.

    Although designed for the center midfielder, these drills will benefit players of any position, including goalies. Koons does a great job detailing the drills on a whiteboard and then taking it to the field. Every coach must teach their team how to skillfully play through the midfield, and Coach Koons gives you the tools to do just that - and more!

    126 minutes. 2017.


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  • 08/13/18--22:00: Playing the 4-2-3-1 System
  • with Marcus Wood, Hardin-Simmons University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III National Champions; 2010 NSCA National Coach of the Year;
    ranks third all-time among NCAA women's soccer coaches at all levels in career winning percentage (.868); 8x American Southwest Conference Coach of the Year; 11x American Southwest Conference champions (including 10 in a row); over 230 career wins; NCAA Record 145 game conference unbeaten streak

    Develop the key techniques and tactics needed to support a reliable system of play.

    Defensively, it allows you to stay organized and compact. Offensively, it allows you to keep numbers around the ball and maintain possession.

    Because it provides defensive stability while still allowing your team to attack aggressively, the 4-2-3-1 is widely used throughout the word. Top-level clubs like Barcelona rely on this system to consistently dominate their opposition .

    Using bulleted coaching points, game footage, tactical chalkboard study and in-depth analysis, Coach Wood breaks down each vital component of successful soccer play using the 4-2-3-1 system. Key coaching points include:

    • training players to recognize the proper visual cues defensively and offensively
    • showing players how to choose the best type of run on the attack
    • developing player skills appropriate for each position

    Coach Wood pays special attention to each required skill and shows them in action through game play. All 11 positions are technically and tactically reviewed to help you know when and how to apply the appropriate coaching points. You'll also learn how to use this information to develop player skills that are appropriate for each position, In addition to the wealth of knowledge and detail provided by Wood, all coaching points and techniques are displayed in a format that will allow you to share the information with your players.

    The 4-2-3-1 system may sound complex, but with Coach Wood's tips and tactics you and your players will be able to play in this formation with confidence.

    73 minutes. 2013.


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    with Bobby Clark, University of Notre Dame Men's Head Coach,
    2013 NCAA Champions - first-ever title in Notre Dame men's soccer history;
    2013 NSCAA Coach of the Year, 2013 ACC Coach of the Year; 2013 ACC Regular Season Champions; Clark has led the Irish to 12 NCAA Tournament appearances (2001-13)

    World-class soccer coach Bobby Clark shows you how to improve your team's possession time. With more time on the ball, your team creates more opportunities in the attack, and reduces opportunities for your opponent. Coach Clark diagrams drills on the whiteboard before demonstrating them on the field, providing a better learning experience for both coaches and athletes.

    Keep Ball Transition Grid
    These grid drills, which work on possessing in transition, start as a 3v1 and progress to 7v5. They can be used as warm-ups to get players working on quick one- and two-touch passing. Players learn how to support their teammates, and create angles to help them pass out of pressure. The importance of playing a soft pass to draw the defender and then a firm pass to split the defense or to get around them quickly is also discussed.

    The "10v6 + 4 Drill" emphasizes seeing the whole field and looking for the open man both near and far. The defenders try to force the turnover by reading and stepping to the offense before a pass is made.

    Barcelona Keep Drills
    A great first touch creates space and time to decide the best option going forward. Coach Clark demonstrates his adaptations of two drills from one of the world's top club teams, FC Barcelona. These challenging drills will teach players how to maintain possession with limited touches.

    Similar to the Barcelona Keep Drill, the Bigger Barcelona Drill focuses on spacing players to make it tougher for the defense to get the ball. This is a great game-like drill that gives options for getting past the defense by working around the opponent, going through the opponent or over the top of the opponent.

    Increase possession time with these exceptional keep ball drills. Possess with a purpose and become a team that plays quicker than opponents both on and off the ball.

    75 minutes. 2014.


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    with Randy Evans,
    former University of Oklahoma Women's Head Soccer Coach

    Coach Evans offers an explanation of the drills and several options that accompany them while using the triangle offense for any level of soccer. Coach Evans shows how the triangle offense will work for your team despite the different player make-ups or abilities that your team may possess. This system is versatile enough to use against many different styles of play that your team may come up against. Evans shows several options ranging from basic to sophisticated to help you adapt your team's level of play to the skills being taught. This video shows how the triangle offense is utilized by dropping the two forwards to help with defensive stability in the midfield. Coach Evans demonstrates this phenomenal system in an easy to understand way by diagramming every aspect of the offense. This is a quality tape that any coach or player can use to better understand this effective, versatile offense.

    70 minutes. 2003.


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